New Mexico Panocha Recipe With 5 Easy And Powerful Steps

Learning about a delicious New Mexico Panocha Recipe sounds like a lot of fun, especially when we review the history behind this very special dish! The flavors behind this dish are powerful, delicious, and a personal favorite. I grew up eating this with family and friends during the tradition of lent.

Although lent is not purely Mexican, the idea behind Panocha is. It is a blend of ideas including from the Aztecs and the Spanish that also brought Catholicism to Mexico. When you follow this easy to read, five step recipe, you will have plenty of Panocha bread to share with your family and friends!

Jump to Recipe

What Is Panocha?

So, what exactly is Panocha? There is a lot of confusion when it comes to Panocha. A lot of people seem to be under the impression that because it is listed as panocha flour recipes, that panocha must be some kind of bread of pastry. This is not necessarily true.

From what I know and have come to learn, Panocha is really a bread pudding made with special panocha flour recipes. This is a really simple desert and recipe to make. Although it is attributed with Mexico, this recipe is more commonly found in New Mexico and Colorado. There are two main ingredients; ground wheat and sugar.

 panocha bread

The History Behind New Mexico Panocha

There is a long and interesting history attributed to this Panocha recipe. This is something often celebrated and enjoyed during the time of lent. Lent is a religious practice that takes approximately forty days. During these forty days, you undergo a mixture of rituals like fasting and no meat Fridays.

While most people like to think that most of Mexican food is from the Aztecs, this was actually something created by the Spanish. In the 1500s was the first time Panocha was mentioned in Latin America, more specifically, the states of Colorado and New Mexico.

Actually, the Aztecs did have a very similar New Mexico Panocha recipe, but instead of wheat, corn was used. This is because the Spanish brought wheat to North America. This was not native to the continent.

You may be wondering to yourself, why New Mexico and Colorado? It is important to remember that before the Spanish and other European countries came to North America, there were a lack of borders. This means that indigenous people also lived in New Mexico and Colorado, which makes sense since they are borders.

Usually, during the time you are supposed to eat this Panocha recipe, it is night. This one recipe takes hours to complete and it is a family activity. The  pudding bread brews and cooks on low slowly, allowing the deliciously sweet smell into your home.

 panocha flour recipes

What You Will Need To Make New Mexico Panocha Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 Cups of Sprouted Wheat panocha flour
  • 1 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups boiling water
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3 cups brown sugar
  • Butter for pan

Equipment

  • Stove Top
  • Measuring Cups
  • 2 Large Pots
  • Sifter
  • 2 Bowls
  • Spoon to Stir
  • Whisk
  • Baking Dish
  • Oven
  • Paper towels

Step By Step Instructions On Panocha Bread

Step 1: Prepare the Ingredients

The first step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe is to prepare the ingredients before hand. It is important to first have all of the ingredients completely measured and placed in separate bowls. This way, there is no confusion.

Step 2: Boil the Sugar and Water

Immediately, add the water and the sugar to the pot. Make sure that the heat is high enough in this New Mexico Panocha recipe so that the water boils and the sugar dissolves. Stir for a minimum of ten minutes before turning down the heat.

Step 3: Mix the Flour into the Pot

The third step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe is to mix in the flour and the rest of the ingredients, not including the butter for the pan, into the pot. Keep on stirring until it is one consistency and there are no lumps from the flour.

Step 4: Prepare the Oven

During the fourth step in the New Mexico Panocha recipe, prepare the oven by setting it to a minimum of 150 degrees Fahrenheit. Not only should you set the oven, but also grab the baking pan and butter it.

Step 5: Bake on Low for 3 Hours

One the oven is done preheating, you are on your last and final step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe. You will need to bake the dish on low for a minimum of three hours. Keep watch though and mix at least once every hour. When you are done, let the pudding cool. It should be thick and almost bread-like.

Tips And Tricks On Making This New Mexico Panocha Recipe

This recipe is really easy to follow and only takes about five steps. There are not a lot of tips and tricks I have for you when completing the New Mexico Panocha recipe. I know that some people have attempted to make this only on the stovetop, but it takes a keen eye and a lot of stirring!

One old friend has made this delicious lent treat as a celebration before in her crockpot! However, if you choose to do this, I recommend using a crockpot plastic liner as it can be very messy and sticky. When storing this, and reheating the New Mexico Panocha recipe, always heat it on the stove for a smooth pudding.

Servings And preparation time

Cook Time

Preparation Time

Serving Size

3 Hours and 15 minutes

10 Minutes

12

All in all, it is a wonderful experience to make this New Mexico Panocha recipe! It is a favorite in my household that I like to recreate with friends and family. This is definitely a long, timeless, and sweet recipe that takes time and lots of hands if you want to turn it into a family thing!

Let us know if you have learned something new about this Panocha recipe. It is scrumptious and unique since it blends Mexican culture with religious, specifically Catholicism! Know anyone interested in this New Mexico Panocha recipe? Send it their way!

 What is panocha flour used for?

FAQs

What is panocha flour used for?

Panocha flour only really used to make Panocha, which is a delicious pudding made with wheat powder for lent.

New Mexico Panocha Recipe

New Mexico Panocha Recipe

Just Mexican Food
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 3 hrs 15 mins
Total Time 3 hrs 25 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine Mexican
Servings 12

Equipment

  • Stove Top
  • Measuring Cups
  • 2 Large Pots
  • Sifter
  • 2 Bowls
  • Spoon to Stir
  • Whisk
  • Baking Dish
  • Oven
  • Paper towels

Ingredients
  

  • 2 Cups of Sprouted Wheat panocha flour
  • 1 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 4 cups boiling water
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 3 cups brown sugar
  • Butter for pan

Instructions
 

  • The first step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe is to prepare the ingredients before hand. It is important to first have all of the ingredients completely measured and placed in separate bowls. This way, there is no confusion.
  • Immediately, add the water and the sugar to the pot. Make sure that the heat is high enough in this New Mexico Panocha recipe so that the water boils and the sugar dissolves. Stir for a minimum of ten minutes before turning down the heat.
  • The third step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe is to mix in the flour and the rest of the ingredients, not including the butter for the pan, into the pot. Keep on stirring until it is one consistency and there are no lumps from the flour.
  • During the fourth step in the New Mexico Panocha recipe, prepare the oven by setting it to a minimum of 150 degrees Fahrenheit. Not only should you set the oven, but also grab the baking pan and butter it.
  • One the oven is done preheating, you are on your last and final step in this New Mexico Panocha recipe. You will need to bake the dish on low for a minimum of three hours. Keep watch though and mix at least once every hour. When you are done, let the pudding cool. It should be thick and almost bread-like.

Notes

This recipe is really easy to follow and only takes about five steps. There are not a lot of tips and tricks I have for you when completing the New Mexico Panocha recipe. I know that some people have attempted to make this only on the stovetop, but it takes a keen eye and a lot of stirring!
Keyword New Mexico panocha recipe, panocha bread, panocha flour recipes, panocha recipe, What is panocha flour used for?